Hours of Operation:
Mon 7:30am - 8:00pm
Tues - Fri 7:30am - 5:30pm

Saturday 8:00am - 4:00pm

24 Hour Emergency Service

Call: 940-464-3231

Argyle Vet

Top Human Medications Toxic to Pets

1. Pain relievers
(Advil, Aleve, Motrin, Tylenol
2. Antidepressants
(Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor)
3. ADD/ADHD medications
(Ritalin, Vyvanse)
4. Sleep aids
(Klonopin, Ambien, Lunesta)
5. Muscle relaxants
(Lioresal, Flexeril)
6. Heart medications
(Cartia, Cardizem)

If your cat has/might have ingested any of the listed toxins CALL OUR HOSPITAL IMMEDIATELY!

Top 10 Toxins in the Kitchen

1. Chocolate
2. Grapes, raisins & currants
3. Xylitol/sugar-free gum/candy
4. Fatty table scraps
5. Onions & garlic
6. Compost
7. Human medications
8. Macadamia nuts
9. Household cleaners
10. Unbaked bread dough/alcohol

If your cat has/might have ingested any of the listed toxins CALL OUR HOSPITAL IMMEDIATELY!

Top 10 Toxins for Cats

1. Topical spot-on insecticides
2. Household cleaners
3. Antidepressants
4. Lilies
5. Insoluble oxalate plants
(Dieffenbachia, Philodendron, etc.)
6. Human and veterinary NSAIDS
7. Cold and flu medication
(Tylenol, Ibuprofen, etc.)
8. Glow sticks
9. ADD/ADHD medications/amphetamines
10. Mouse and rat poison

If your cat has/might have ingested any of the listed toxins CALL OUR HOSPITAL IMMEDIATELY!

Equine Vaccination Guide

Argyle Veterinary Hospital
Equine Vaccination Guide

Adults (1 year and older)
Flu – every 6 months
Rhino – every 6 months
West Nile – every 12 months
VEWT – every 12 months
Rabies – every 12 months
Strangles (Strep) – every 12 months

Foal
Foals born to mares who were vaccinated at the 10th month of gestation
o Full set of vaccines at 6 months of age
o Booster all vaccines again at 7 months of age
Foals born to mares who were NOT vaccinated prior to foaling
o Full set of vaccines at 3 months, 4 months & 5 months
Start annual adult vaccines at 1 year of age

Pregnant Mares
• Rhino give at 3,5 & 7 months gestation
• Full set of vaccines (flu given intramuscular) at 10 months gestation

** Happy New Year **

New Years

 

 

Our office is closed today.

If you have a large or small animal emergency
Please Contact our 24 hour Emergency Service at (940) 464-3231.

 We will return to normal operating hours Thursday January 2nd, 2014

~~ Merry Christmas ~~

 

Merry Christmas 2013

 

Our office is closed today.

If you have a Small or Large Animal emergency please contact our 24 hour On Call Emergency Service (940) 464-3231

We will return to normal operating hours Thursday December 26, 2013

~~ Christmas Eve ~~

Christmas

 

 

Our office will close early today.

If you have a large or small animal emergency
Please Contact our 24 hour Emergency Service at (940) 464-3231.

 We will return to normal operating hours Thursday December 26th, 2013

Why is Obesity so Dangerous for Pets?

The following article is taken from the “Purina® Animal Instincts” Podcast Series. Learn more at www.purina.com.

Obesity is just as dangerous for pets as it is for humans. The extra pounds weigh on an animal’s cardiovascular and respiratory systems, exacerbating existing problems and causing new ones. Fat cats and dogs are also prone to injury, more at risk in surgery, and predisposed to conditions such as diabetes. And the laundry list of problems doesn’t end there. Decreased stamina, diminished immune function, and digestive disorders are all potential consequences of obesity.

Being severely overweight can significantly diminish your cat or dog’s quality of life. So when your porky pet pleads with you for an extra treat, remember that saying no may be the kindest response.

– Dr. Andrea Looney, DVM

Equine Deworming Regiments

Deworming Regiments

 

Parasites are a leading cause of colic in the horse!  Strategic deworming is an important part of your horses preventive health program.  In the spring worms encysted (or hibernating) in the wall of the colon emerge due to favorable environmental conditions.  Killing these parasites prior to the emerging process will prevent a lot of damage to the intestine and thus helping prevent colic.  Incorporating a single dose of moxidectin (Quest), in the early spring, into your rotation will accomplish this goal.

 

Due to the concern of drug resistance, coupled with the fact that no new anthelmentic’s are being developed, then recommended way to control intestinal parasites has evolved.  Parasitologists believe that 80% of intestinal parasites are shed by 20% of the horse population.  Rather than automatically deworming every two to three months, it is now recommended that the use of an anthelmentic be based on a fecal exam.  If the fecal is negative, there is no need to deworm.  In a given population of horses, after a series of fecal exams, it usually becomes apparent which horses are the shedders.

 

Deworming Programs

 

1)      Deworm based on routine fecal analysis

  1. Identify worm burden, deworm accordingly
  2. Deworm every 6 months regardless as a purge treatment and to control bots

2)      Paste/liquid dewormer once every 60 days, rotating anthelcides.

Example:

  • January – Strongid (Pyrantel Pamoate) Safe for ages 3 months and OLDER
  • March – Ivermectin
  • May – Moxidectin (Quest) Safe for ages 6 months and OLDER
  • July – Ivermectin
  • September – Oxibendazole (Anthelcide)
  • November – Ivermectin with Fenbendazole (Equimax)

 

3)      Daily dewormer with Strongid C or Strongid C2x along with Ivermiectin twice yearly for control of bots.

 

 

 

 

John F Bitter DVm

Argyle Veterinary Hospital

by KATHY PRINE AND FURBY BROWN (HAPPY SNORT SNORT) on Argyle Veterinary Hospital

To TerriThe best groomer everHappy 20th AnniversaryFeb 9 1996Twenty years ago on this date Ben Brown brought in this very nasty matted dog he ... Read More

Page 1 of 26:
«
 
 
1
2
3
 
»